Summer Sun & Fun

Now that summer is officially over, we thought it was a good opportunity to share some of our out-of-office adventures from the season. After all, all work and no play makes for dull architects!

***

Carlos spent time in his hometown of San Juan, Argentina. He lectured at the National University of San Juan’s architectural school; enjoyed an opera performance in the city’s brand new concert hall; visited a museum where the nation’s seventh president Domingo Faustino Sarmiento was born; and enjoyed good food and wine at the Graffigna-Yanzon vineyard in Valle de Pedernal about an hour south of the city.

Michael Walch and his partner spent most weekends at their house upstate in the Hudson Valley. Between hunting for and refinishing vintage furniture, painting, and gardening, they invited friends over to enjoy local food and wine.

Sunčića travelled to India for a college friend’s wedding. It was a bit of a “study in textures” as she experienced the detail of Mumbai’s airport, danced in sari fabrics, was decorated in henna for the wedding celebration, and caught glimpses of the broad variation of multi-family housing egress stair construction.

Ari used “Stone Age tech” while staying at his cottage in the woods. He built a new deck, added footings and framed the walls for a shed while taking care of some overdue structural improvements on the house. He also let out his inner lumberjack, felling trees and chopping firewood. Luckily, he found a little time to swim, fish, kayak, and take an occasional bike rides.

180827-postremovalmachine

Janine welcomed baby Dean with her husband Chris and daughter Ella. The newest member of the ESKW/A fam was born July 31, 2018, and measured 8 pounds, 15 ounces and 22.5 inches! The Golub crew visited the office, however Dean slept through most of it.

Chris cracked jokes at a wedding for an old buddy he’s known since middle school. The wedding was in Cincinnati, Ohio, where his mom grew up, so he got to see friends and family in a 2-for-1 travel special.

wedding in cincy

Kimberly explored the woods with her family around her place upstate and finally succeeded in getting their dog to join them on the paddleboat.

Ruth canoed the “lovely Lake Sebago” at Harriman State Park. In the past, she explored the wilderness by canoeing lakes in the Adirondacks and Ontario with her family. Early this summer, she had a chance to see a late 19th-century atrium modeled after shopping arcades in Milano and Brussels. This one, alas, was in Cleveland,.

Jon Mark went up to Maine for some fresh air and canoeing of his own—and apparently prefers landscapes to selfies so we must trust this is really his vacation photo and not a stock photo titled “beautiful/peaceful lake.”

20180907_111756

***

It was a good summer for everyone, but of course, we also did a lot of work: breaking ground on 3500 Park Avenue, taking a tour of the Sharks! exhibit, and following the construction of the Bedford Green House. We closed out the summer in traditional ESKW/A style with an office party in Brooklyn at the end of September, so check back soon for a photo album of the season-ending soiree!

 

Advertisements

Public Housing & Corduroy Pants

By Frank Ball

If you ask anybody from the undergraduate program at the Pratt School of Architecture who Donald Cromley is, they will have a story for you. I started asking this question to fellow Pratt alumni here at ESKW/A, and their stories spanned the length of his career. He was once the right-hand man to modernist architect Marcel Breuer. At Pratt, Cromley was the department chair, building technology coordinator, and still works as a professor in both history and design. Most are surprised to learn not only that he is still teaching, but that even now in his late seventies, he still leads a walking tour through New Haven. Recently I went on this tour and was moved by what I saw.

On a Saturday morning in March, Donald Cromley’s students gathered at Grand Central. Even though I had graduated, I reached out ahead of time and asked to tag along. We took a New Haven-bound Metro North train to the end of the line and departed at Union Station.

Image by Frank Ball

We stood outside the station and looked at a stocky concrete apartment complex across the street. It was called the Church Street South Housing Project, completed by the late architect Charles Moore in 1969. Moore had been dean of Yale’s Department of Architecture (later the Yale School of Architecture) from 1965-1970, and would be remembered as a pioneer of post-modernism.

At the time when Moore designed Church Street South, his work was experimental. The façade obeyed a classical system, but with new materials. What would later be known as post-modernism essentially borrowed iconography from traditional architecture, mixed it together with modernism, and then reassembled everything into something new. The result was refreshing, and in a conceptual way, elevated Church Street South above a level of just basic housing.

Photo credits clockwise from left (collage by Frank Ball): clipgoo.com | Elliot Brown on Flickr, via the National Trust for Historic Preservation at savingplaces.org | The Museum of the City of New York at collections.mcny.org| Larry Speck at larryspeck.com

“Modernists liked this, you see?” Cromley pointed to the façade and tugged at the leg of his corduroy pants. Like his modernist contemporaries, Cromley also wore a bowtie (because a regular necktie could fall on his drawings and smudge.) Anyway, his point was that Moore used a ribbed block. To be more specific, ribbed block was applied throughout the exterior, except where classical details belonged. The top of the façade is smooth to express a cornice, corners are crisp with reversed quoins, and windows are cleanly trimmed. Everything else is rough and textural ––like corduroy pants.

Image found at newhavenurbanism.org

Once upon a time, the complex was painted with bright super graphics; there were architectural follies and sculptural elements, all early characteristics of Moore’s work. Today, the Church Street Housing complex is scheduled to be razed. We happened to visit on a day when the demolition crews weren’t working, and some buildings waited patiently to be torn down.

Paul Rudolph’s Temple Street Parking Garage

Image by Frank Ball

We continued on our tour. New Haven has an abnormally high number of parking garages. One such garage is Paul Rudolph’s Temple Street Parking Garage.

Image by Frank Ball

“Pay attention to the fenestration.”

We gathered around an elevator vestibule in the parking structure. Rudolph’s office designed the glass wall with simple off-the-shelf parts. The system doesn’t hold up to modern energy codes and has been replaced in other parts of the garage. But because the space inside the vestibule is actually unconditioned, it was allowed to stay. Cromley said these window mullions were originally used in other Paul Rudolph projects, including his namesake: Rudolph Hall.

One corollary of the modern movement was the use of as few materials as possible. As we walked out of the garage and looked back, the concrete streetlights on the upper deck were visible. Yes, concrete streetlights.

“Thank God he didn’t try concrete mullions!”

So why were there so many modernist architects working in New Haven anyway? Cromley told that it was an example of the town versus the gown. In the 1950s the president of Yale, Alfred Griswold, decreed that all significant construction on campus would be avant-garde, freeing Yale from the collegiate-gothic tradition. The amount of courage that it took for an Ivy League president to suggest this, let alone to convince a board of trustees to go along with it, is remarkable. Not to be out done, Mayor of New Haven Richard Lee said the same of municipal construction. Because so many modernist architects were already working on projects at Yale or were in the academic circle, they enjoyed easy access to New Haven projects. As Cromley put it, Griswold simply gave his list of approved architects to Lee.

There are examples of this quirky reciprocity throughout the City of New Haven:

Architect

Yale

New Haven

Paul Rudolph Rudolph Hall, 1961-1963 Temple Street Garage, 1961
Marcel Breuer Becton Engineering and Applied Science Center, 1968-1970 Armstrong Rubber Co, 1968
SOM Beinecke Library (Gordon Bunshaft), 1961-1963 Conte School, 1962
Charles Moore Dean of Yale’s Department of Architecture, 1965-1970 Church Street South, 1969

Please make no mistake, there are plenty of examples of architects working in New Haven before working at Yale, and by no means did an architect have to build in either locale to be considered successful. It also didn’t hurt that New Haven had been designated a “Model City” and benefitted from federal funding for urban renewal.

Yet I found other examples of the relationship between buildings at Yale and New Haven that are more complex. For example, the ribbed block on Charles Moore’s Church Street South Housing Project was invented by Paul Rudolph’s office. The concept had essentially been prototyped on Rudolph Hall. This was also a nice homage on Moore’s part, as he became dean immediately after Paul Rudolph but ran the department very differently.

Image by Gunnar Klack

I couldn’t help but reflect on another part of my education while thinking about Donald Cromley’s tour. At about the time when I graduated, Reinier de Graaf, an architect and partner at the firm OMA, published the ominously titled article, “Architecture is now a tool of capital, complicit in a purpose antithetical to its social mission.” The title pretty much sums up the point I’m trying to make, but what happened?

Moore, whom I mentioned earlier, was hardly the first famous modern architect to take on housing for the social good. To name a few, Frank Lloyd Wright, Alvar Aalto, Le Corbusier, and Louis Kahn all stamped their names to various forms of housing for those who could not otherwise afford it. In a way, low-income housing was a perfect corollary to the adage that “less is more,” because these architects had to work with less.

Today it’s hard to escape the feeling that architects primarily serve a privileged class (and that’s part of why I’m so proud to work where I do), but I want to see architecture at large return to its humanitarian past.


Frank Ball is a graduate of the Pratt School of Architecture and currently an architectural designer at ESKW/A. Among other things, he is currently working on the new construction of 76 units of supportive and affordable housing at 1921 Cortelyou Road.

St. Lucy’s Housing

ESKW/A traveled up to 103rd Street recently to snap some photos of our work on St. Lucy’s Housing, a pair of apartment buildings in East Harlem that provides 100 units for seniors and families.  Our team renovated the shared backyard landscape, corridors, cellars, community rooms + kitchens, as well as providing upgrades to the elevators, heating, and roofing systems.  We were pleased to have the opportunity to spruce up the shared backyard space for the residents, especially with the warm weather in full swing.  With the organic curves to the paths in plan and a natural aesthetic of concrete and wood, we’re proud of the results.