Exemplifying “Design for Healthy Living”

other statue

The view from the event location

Last week, four of our team members attended Design for Healthy Living, hosted by the Center for Active Design (CfAD) in collaboration with the NYC Department of Design and Construction (DDC). In the spirit of the event, we walked the few blocks to 31 Chambers Street where it was held.

The interactive session included lectures, breakouts, and feedback— all focused on the intersection of design and health. Our team attended because we know architects are in a unique position to affect positive health outcomes in several ways, and because ESKW/A has been following the CfAD since FitCity 1 in 2006 (more on that later).

The Center for Active Design’s goals are to support the creation of environments that improve productivity, community engagement, and civic trust—while reducing stress, anxiety, depression, and social isolation. They put a strong emphasis on providing these types of spaces and amenities to some of the population’s most vulnerable groups, including at-risk youth, older adults, and those affected by homelessness and mental health issues, among others. This hit home for us.

Much of ESKW/A’s work—from affordable and supporting housing to community centers and schools—puts CfAD’s philosophies into action. In fact, our New Settlement Community Campus project was featured in one of the presentation’s slides (more on that later, too). We found the event valuable not only because it dealt with issues central to our core mission, but also because it provided the opportunity for discussion as opposed to feeling somewhat one-sided.

group discussion

Some of the most compelling takeaways indeed came from attendees who participated in the sharing session. One designer remarked that he saw a lot of active design strategies in the nicer neighborhoods of Manhattan but stressed the need for “equity across boroughs.” Another remarked that active design is important, but it shouldn’t come at the cost of accessible design. Perhaps the most captivating story came from a man who does work in Brownsville, Brooklyn, where conflict between public housing developments have had a grave impact on the neighborhood. To counter this, his organization worked to beautify the public space between the two and create a place each development is connected to through murals. He stressed that good design principles are most needed in communities that have been historically disenfranchised, marginalized, and overlooked.

“The Brownsville project resonated. As design professionals, we have an obligation to the community. As our work may be pinpointed to one building, we should be aware of the surroundings of a project and respond with compassion,” Suncica Jasarovic, one of our architectural designers, said after the event. “Our job as architects is to design for the health and well-being of humanity.”

Our very own Kimberly Murphy attended the first FitCity in 2006 and has been supporting the agenda ever since. She even spoke at the 10th annual event in 2016. Here are some slides from her presentation about New Settlement Community Campus, a project that exemplifies active design:

These things continue to matter to her and to us today. Below you’ll see she’s still “rocking” and reading to children at the New Settlement Community Campus. The project—a collaboration among the Settlement Housing Fund, NYC Department of Education, NYC School Construction Authority, and ESKW/A and Dattner Architects—was also featured in last week’s presentation. CfAD applauded the use of color to support wayfinding and locate programming in a building with many functions: a public school, D75 school, and intermediate/high school, in addition to a community center.

Kimberly NSCC Slide

“Healthy design and evidence-based research are especially relevant to our work, considering that our clients serve a range of at-risk New Yorkers: seniors, homeless or formerly homeless, children, mentally ill, people living at or below the poverty line,” explained Kimberly. “Our work has always taken a humanistic approach, and to hear that designers have a responsibility as health professionals is very interesting. It boosts the importance of design strategies that we consider best practices and pushes our strategies to new levels.”

We thank the CfAD and NYC DDC for their continued work in this arena, and for a great afternoon (and for the cheese)! To learn more about other projects of ours that address community concerns, click the links below:

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Designing Actively

Spring is here, and as we emerge from our winter hiding places, a lot of us are turning our attention to cultivating a more active lifestyle.

In light of that shift in attitude, it felt very appropriate to attend and participate in the AIANY’s 10th annual Fit City. The event provided a full day’s worth of presentations and panel discussions with architects, planners, designers, developers, government officials, community advocates, and public health professionals, all centered around one common goal:

How can we work together to create a built environment that keeps us healthy?

ESKW/A was happy to share our experience designing the New Settlement Community Campus (with Dattner Architects), which has recently been honored with an Excellence Award from the Center for Active Design.  Kimberly Murphy took part in the panel on Designing for Health in Affordable Housing to discuss how the Community Campus has been a life-changing boon for the residents of a largely low-income neighborhood of the Bronx.

Later that day, Amanda Sengstacken and Melissa Rouse of ESKW/A joined Kimberly along with Bill Stein and David Levine from Dattner Architects to accept the award which was hosted at the Steelcase showroom in Columbus Circle. Other honored projects were presented and the event was a great opportunity to visit with colleagues doing good work across the country. We enjoyed visiting with fellow panelist Bill Sabattini of Dekker/Perich/Sabatini Architects whose Casitas de Colores creates a community in downtown Albuquerque, NM, with an abundance of active living opportunities. We agree with Bill; active design isn’t rocket science, it’s just good practice.

We also appreciated the planning and design work that went into SWA Group’s Guthrie Green project in Tulsa, OK. We can relate to principal Elizabeth Shreeve’s appreciation for working with clients whose mission is truly inspired.

We thank Carol, Jack, and Megan from SHF and New Settlement for envisioning and now facilitating NSCC whose life post-occupancy is exceeding all expectations.  A good time was had by all, and we look forward to future active design opportunities.

Kudos for 4380 Bronx Blvd and New Settlement Community Campus

We are very pleased to announce two new awards:

4380 Bronx Blvd., our renovation of a warehouse into a men’s shelter for Project Renewal, has been awarded a Silver Medal of Honor from the Society Of American Registered Architects.

And New Settlement Community Campus has been named an Excellence Winner by the Center for Active Design.

The 2015 Center for Active Design Awards have already garnered media attention, with articles from the Architect’s Newspaper Blog, and Fast Company.