Office Field Trip to Sharks!

Last month our office toured the new Ocean Wonders: Sharks! exhibit at the New York Aquarium. Having served as Associate Architect and Architect of Record on this dynamic and highly technical project, we were very excited and proud to show-and-tell the exhibit with the entire office. See our photos below, and head to Coney Island while the weather is still nice and check it out for yourself.

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Happy 30th Anniversary, Randy!

On July 12, 2018, we celebrated Partner Randy Wood’s 30th anniversary with the firm. Staff, family, and friends toasted Randy’s career with champagne, wine, and craft beers. We enjoyed BBQ and listened to musical stylings curated by the guest of honor himself—while muted screenings of Randy’s favorite films (West Side Story, Blade Runner, Repo Man, Brazil, In Like Flint, Spirited Away, Gojira, and Thunderbirds Are Go) played in the background.

Randy started at The Edelman Partnership / Architects in 1988 and has worked on a wide variety of housing, community facilities, institutional, and most recently cultural and aquatics projects. From Two Bridges to True Colors; LaMama Theater to LaMattina Wildlife Center; and St. Marks to Sharks!, Randy has led the firm with a trademark combination of calm and humor.

We at ESKW / Architects (past and present staff alike!) thank Randy for his leadership—and even though he loves the Patriots and Red Sox, we appreciate his devotion to New York City architecture.

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From the early days…

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…to nowadays, the man wears many hats…

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… and a suit and tie when needed!

Here’s to 30 more years!

Breaking Ground at 3500 Park Avenue

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Attendees included Mega Contracting Group, the NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development, Boston Financial Investment Management, and JPMorgan Chase.

July 12 marked the groundbreaking ceremony for 3500 Park Avenue in the Bronx.

“New affordable housing units are coming to our borough, giving many a new lease on life—literally,” said News 12 The Bronx Anchor Dave Roush, in the video at the end of the post.

When completed (in about two years), the 7-story building will offer 69 supportive housing units for formerly homeless veterans with disabilities, adults with mental illness, and seniors. An additional 46 affordable housing units are open to those earning 60% of the area median income, to be selected through a lottery system.

“Claremont Village in the Bronx is a little removed in regards to proximity to public transit, so The Bridge is super excited to incorporate a fresh, helpful, positive building in the neighborhood,” said Sunčića Jašarovič, one of our architectural designers on the project. “The client’s compassion for the community is always growing.”

Susan Wiviott, CEO of The Bridge, welcomed the gathering of developers, funding groups, architects, and media, stressing how desperately in need of affordable housing the city is. “It’s great to have everyone come together in support of our mission at an event like this,” she said. “It’s important to work with people you can trust.”

As the golden ceremonial shovels stood nearby, Nicole Ferreira, senior vice-president of multi-family finance with NYC Homes and Community Renewal, acknowledged that these projects take a lot of work to get off the ground and spoke about what the event and project represented.

“It’s important to us that no New Yorker is left behind,” said Ferreira. “This project is all about a celebration of a fresh start and a new hope. It will strengthen the Bronx community and economy.”

Greg Maher, executive director of the Leviticus Fund, echoed her remarks. “This is the largest acquisition loan in our history, and it’s in support of the largest project in The Bridge’s history,” he said. “This sends a message that vulnerable groups will not go overlooked in this city.”

For more information, see coverage from The Bronx Times and New York Nonprofit Media, and check out the local news report below. “That corner has been a little eyesore, so now it’ll bring some vitality back to the community and just give it more life,” Etta Ritter, a lifelong Bronx resident, told News 12.

We’re honored to be a part of the team and to serve this mission—and look forward to sharing construction updates!

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News 12: “Affordable housing project gets underway in the Bronx”

Mayor de Blasio Visits 1561 Walton Avenue

de BlasioToday, at Settlement Housing Fund‘s 1561 Walton Avenue, the Mayor announced that 2017 marked the highest number of affordable housing units produced in the City’s history.

His administration financed 32,116 affordable homes last year, breaking the all-time record previously set by former Mayor Ed Koch in 1989 of 25,243 units, according to the press release. The City also broke the record for the most new construction with 9,140 affordable homes. Nearly 60 percent of all homes financed will serve New Yorkers making less than $47,000 for a family of three.

We’re honored to serve this mission. Below are the official photos of our 1561 Walton Avenue project, which provided 60 affordable units.

A video of today’s event appears at the end of the post, in which Mayor de Blasio hands a resident the keys to her new home to celebrate the milestone.

 

#AskAnArchitect with Kimberly Murphy

The American Institute of Architecture Students stopped by recently to kick off the second season of their #AskAnArchitect series. Kimberly talks about work-life balance, gives advice about how to find the right firm, and reminisces on her own college days. Thanks, AIAS!

Emphasizing Color at the Murphy Clubhouse Pool

2018DS10 Thomas S. Murphy Clubhouse PoolThe official photos of the Madison Square Boys & Girls Club’s Thomas S. Murphy Clubhouse Pool are in, so we thought it was an ideal opportunity to tell the color story of the project.

The design team used a neutral background palette of grays, white, and natural wood, a decision inspired by the look and feel of luxury spas. “When you let the context be subtle and simple, it’s easy to make other things stand out,” explained Annie Kountz, an architectural designer on the project.

The pool itself is a rich blue due to a special pigment in the plaster. It was envisioned as a deep plane that would lay in contrast to the soft surroundings. “Most rec pools are an aqua or turquoise color, but this blue really pops,” Kountz said.

The existing pool ventilation was outdated and insufficient, so a primary goal of the project was to replace the system which included a round duct above the pool deck. “The duct is actually fabric instead of sheet metal, which allowed for the bright orange color,” said Janine Sutton Golub, another architect on the team. “Blue and orange are complementary, so it doesn’t take anything away. It mimics and outlines the pool’s shape.”

Even with the central focus of blue and orange color at the pool, the design highlights the real stars of the space: the children themselves. As the photos show, their energy and activity take center stage against a neutral, although not uninteresting, backdrop. The design concept was to create a strong tile mosaic that commenced in the lobby and extended into the pool room. The final solution is a massive 90-foot mosaic comprised of white, black, and gray glass tiles by Architectural Ceramics. “There are also hints of beige and a shimmer,” added Kountz.

The development of the mural image became a project of its own. “At first, we thought we’d use an image of an Olympic swimmer, and we searched for inspiring stock images of swimmers, but there were no appropriate images,” Kountz explained. “So we thought, why not just take pictures of the kids? It’s much more meaningful.”

The club’s owner’s rep, LOM Properties, connected with an underwater photographer who volunteered to hold a photoshoot with 30 swimmers from the Murphy Club. The photoshoot resulted in images and still shots from video that were composed and rendered into the mosaic image by the architects. Shadows, light, and bubbles were added to create depth. The image was taken by the tile sub-contractor, pixelized, and samples were created for the architect’s review. Upon approval, the matted tile sheets were numbered, laid out, and then installed on the pool.

The kids take immense pride in their new space (in an earlier post, one graded the work an A+++).

The mural extends into the new open lobby, creating a central hub. “When you look in, you see the blue, and see the wall going into the pool. But up close, the wall is kind of an abstract scene,” said Kountz. “When you sit in the viewing area and look across, it’s a big statement.”

Extending The Bridge at the Partners in Caring Awards Gala

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ESKW/A team members mingle before the evening’s program begins.

On June 6, The Bridge held its 2018 Partners in Caring Awards Gala. In celebrating the organization’s work, two individuals were honored with awards, and funds were raised to bring help, hope, and opportunity to thousands of New Yorkers.

Cynthia C. Wainright, president of The Bridge’s board of directors, opened with remarks noting the agency’s 64 years of service. Currently, it houses 1,385 individuals from vulnerable populations in 24 buildings, two shelters, and over 500 apartments throughout the five boroughs.

“And next month, we will open a 66-unit residence on Maple Street in Brooklyn, which will support another 50 adults with serious mental illness and provide 16 affordable housing units for families,” Wainright added.

Wainright was referring to our East New York Avenue project with The Bridge. “No pressure,” one of our team members teased the project manager. The building is rapidly nearing completion.

An incredibly moving video showed Bridge clients living in their spaces and participating in programming that includes art therapy, horticulture therapy, and Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) sessions. Residents marveled at how now they simply feel free and safe in their new homes. A service staff member encouraged them that this is not their last step either, as many clients have transitioned through Bridge shelters and programs to permanent housing. The video closed with the poem “Myself” by Edgar Guest.

“The stories were tear-jerking,” said Sunčića Jašarović, one of our architectural designers. “What a wonderful organization.”

After the video, a client named Gregory spoke about his success story. Having spent 15 years with The Bridge, he has earned his GED, begun a career in maintenance at Bellevue Hospital, and become a U.S. Citizen.

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Mike Ong, project manager on East New York Avenue (somewhat seen behind him).

“I try to achieve in life,” Gregory said. “If I didn’t believe in achieving, I wouldn’t have come this far.”

The Curtis Berger Award was given to Gary Hattem, an advisor to nonprofit organizations. His work with banks, trusts, and foundations has helped make The Bridge’s work possible.

“Society has experienced a loss of social cohesion and what holds us together, but The Bridge brings everyone together in a common cause, in a feeling of unity and purpose,” Hattem said. “Everyone has a place in New York City. Everyone has an opportunity.”

The Partner in Caring Inspiration Award went to Leslie Jamison, an author, instructor at Columbia, and graduate of Harvard as well as the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. Her writing details her own battles with addiction and her journey to recovery. Guests received a hardcover of her most recent work, The Recovering. (And a tote bag. And a potted plant centerpiece, if they desired.)

“I found kindred spirits in the people who work at The Bridge,” Jamison said. “When I was fighting my addiction, I had access to all the resources—good doctors and therapists, a recovery community, supportive friends and family—that could help me recover. But many of The Bridge’s clients don’t have these resources available to them. The Bridge gives them access to all kinds of support they wouldn’t otherwise have.”

The night was an awe-inspiring celebration of the work the agency, architects, developers, and other groups have done—and a dynamic urge for the work to continue.

“The most important part of our work is that we are making it possible for people living in shelters, on the street, or in psychiatric hospitals to move into safe and affordable housing—fully furnished and equipped—so they can get their lives back on track. It’s a very tangible impact,” Carole Gordon, senior vice president for housing development at The Bridge, told us after the event. “The gala brought together people from so many walks of life. Hopefully they left with a good feeling and want to continue to support us in whatever way they can.”

If the donation thermometer is any indicator (it surpassed the $20,000 goal within minutes and was still rising as we left), then these efforts are sure to continue. And if this photo booth flip book is another indicator, then it’s a safe bet that people walked away with good feelings too.