Remembering Judy Edelman

Today marks the anniversary of the passing of one our founders, Judith Edelman.

Her legacy of designing housing, health clinics, and other community-focused buildings for New York City’s most vulnerable populations still guides the firm today. She remains a pioneer and role model to women architects and to the industry as a whole.

 

To learn more about her, visit the links below.

  • She describes her motivation and experience being an architect in an interview on our own blog from 2012.
  • As one of the first women in a male-dominated field, she earned the moniker “Dragon Lady”.
  • For a more extensive biography, see her obituary in The New York Times.
  • In 1975, she appeared on Sesame Street to show children what an architect is and does.

Please visit the Legacy and Profile sections of our website for more about Judy and our office’s history.

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Summer Sun & Fun

Now that summer is officially over, we thought it was a good opportunity to share some of our out-of-office adventures from the season. After all, all work and no play makes for dull architects!

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Carlos spent time in his hometown of San Juan, Argentina. He lectured at the National University of San Juan’s architectural school; enjoyed an opera performance in the city’s brand new concert hall; visited a museum where the nation’s seventh president Domingo Faustino Sarmiento was born; and enjoyed good food and wine at the Graffigna-Yanzon vineyard in Valle de Pedernal about an hour south of the city.

Michael Walch and his partner spent most weekends at their house upstate in the Hudson Valley. Between hunting for and refinishing vintage furniture, painting, and gardening, they invited friends over to enjoy local food and wine.

Sunčića travelled to India for a college friend’s wedding. It was a bit of a “study in textures” as she experienced the detail of Mumbai’s airport, danced in sari fabrics, was decorated in henna for the wedding celebration, and caught glimpses of the broad variation of multi-family housing egress stair construction.

Ari used “Stone Age tech” while staying at his cottage in the woods. He built a new deck, added footings and framed the walls for a shed while taking care of some overdue structural improvements on the house. He also let out his inner lumberjack, felling trees and chopping firewood. Luckily, he found a little time to swim, fish, kayak, and take an occasional bike rides.

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Janine welcomed baby Dean with her husband Chris and daughter Ella. The newest member of the ESKW/A fam was born July 31, 2018, and measured 8 pounds, 15 ounces and 22.5 inches! The Golub crew visited the office, however Dean slept through most of it.

Chris cracked jokes at a wedding for an old buddy he’s known since middle school. The wedding was in Cincinnati, Ohio, where his mom grew up, so he got to see friends and family in a 2-for-1 travel special.

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Kimberly explored the woods with her family around her place upstate and finally succeeded in getting their dog to join them on the paddleboat.

Ruth canoed the “lovely Lake Sebago” at Harriman State Park. In the past, she explored the wilderness by canoeing lakes in the Adirondacks and Ontario with her family. Early this summer, she had a chance to see a late 19th-century atrium modeled after shopping arcades in Milano and Brussels. This one, alas, was in Cleveland,.

Jon Mark went up to Maine for some fresh air and canoeing of his own—and apparently prefers landscapes to selfies so we must trust this is really his vacation photo and not a stock photo titled “beautiful/peaceful lake.”

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It was a good summer for everyone, but of course, we also did a lot of work: breaking ground on 3500 Park Avenue, taking a tour of the Sharks! exhibit, and following the construction of the Bedford Green House. We closed out the summer in traditional ESKW/A style with an office party in Brooklyn at the end of September, so check back soon for a photo album of the season-ending soiree!

 

Office Field Trip to Sharks!

Last month our office toured the new Ocean Wonders: Sharks! exhibit at the New York Aquarium. Having served as Associate Architect and Architect of Record on this dynamic and highly technical project, we were very excited and proud to show-and-tell the exhibit with the entire office. See our photos below, and head to Coney Island while the weather is still nice and check it out for yourself.

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Happy 30th Anniversary, Randy!

On July 12, 2018, we celebrated Partner Randy Wood’s 30th anniversary with the firm. Staff, family, and friends toasted Randy’s career with champagne, wine, and craft beers. We enjoyed BBQ and listened to musical stylings curated by the guest of honor himself—while muted screenings of Randy’s favorite films (West Side Story, Blade Runner, Repo Man, Brazil, In Like Flint, Spirited Away, Gojira, and Thunderbirds Are Go) played in the background.

Randy started at The Edelman Partnership / Architects in 1988 and has worked on a wide variety of housing, community facilities, institutional, and most recently cultural and aquatics projects. From Two Bridges to True Colors; LaMama Theater to LaMattina Wildlife Center; and St. Marks to Sharks!, Randy has led the firm with a trademark combination of calm and humor.

We at ESKW / Architects (past and present staff alike!) thank Randy for his leadership—and even though he loves the Patriots and Red Sox, we appreciate his devotion to New York City architecture.

 

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From the early days…

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…to nowadays, the man wears many hats…

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… and a suit and tie when needed!

Here’s to 30 more years!

#AskAnArchitect with Kimberly Murphy

The American Institute of Architecture Students stopped by recently to kick off the second season of their #AskAnArchitect series. Kimberly talks about work-life balance, gives advice about how to find the right firm, and reminisces on her own college days. Thanks, AIAS!

Office Book Club: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

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Over drinks and ‘d’oeuvres at a TriBeCa bistro, the ESKW/A Office Book Club dove into early-20th century Williamsburg through A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. One of our most tenured team members chose it because—for shame—only one of us had actually read it in school, although it was published in 1943. It turns out our coming-of-age would have to come a little later!

Each of us connected with a different aspect of the story. No spoilers here, but themes of hard-working immigrants, authoritarian figureheads, and reversals of fortune resonated most with us.

“It was lovely,” said Lauretta daCruz, our office manager. “Sometimes we have a terrific book but not a great conversation, or a book no one really liked it and a really good discussion. But [that] night was an awesome chat and we all really loved the book. That was nice.”

Betty Smith crafted such an engaging protagonist that many of us felt like Francie’s memories and experiences were our own—as she went to school, found a job, fell in love, and became herself.

“I felt like I knew her!” quipped Carlos Salinas Weber, one of our architects.

If you need a page-turner for a commute or want to get lost in your recliner at home, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn has our recommendation. There are so many hilarious, heartbreaking, tenacious, and trying little moments and connections throughout. And at a solid but smooth 493 pages, each stretch feels like an accomplishment. Reading it was a challenging yet rewarding experience.

Last night’s meetup marked the seventh completed book since the group’s inception in February 2017—a remarkable achievement considering the team’s regular readings and responsibilities related to work and life in general. The growing list includes The Devil and the White City, Telex from Cuba, The Sellout, Ghost Boy, The Last Painting of Sarah de Vos, and Pedro Paramo.

Next up is the recently departed Philip Roth’s American Pastoral. Other authors we’re eyeing include Don DeLillo, David Foster Wallace, and Tom Wolfe. Give us your recommendations in the comments!

Building on the Chinatown Health Clinic Foundation

Charles B Wang elevationBy Chris Curtland

Several of our team members attended the Chinatown Health Clinic Foundation’s 47th Annual Gala on May 8, which was held to raise funds to improve access to quality healthcare for underserved Asian Americans and other vulnerable populations.

ESKW/A designed the Charles B. Wang Community Health Center (CBWCHC) for adaptive reuse (at right; interior photos at post ending) in 2003, which was our fourth commission undertaken for the foundation. We also helped sponsor the gala and are currently working with CBWCHC on a new construction clinic project in Flushing.

Charles B. Wang donated $2.5 million at the event, while those in attendance bid several thousands on a variety of outings and goods. Even those who didn’t win an auction took home handsome prizes of their own in a swag bag, which included Hi-Chews, fortune cookies, crackers, ramen, and a stress ball.

The event’s attendance was staggering, as 800 guests filled the enormous Jing Fong restaurant on Elizabeth Street. Aries Dela Cruz, Manhattan’s regional representative for Governor Cuomo, gave opening remarks about how encouraging it was to see so many dedicated to a cause that began with so few supporters decades ago. Jane T. Eng, Esq., president and CEO of CBWCHC, energized the crowd by asserting that healthcare access should be universal, which resounded with our team.

“I was inspired to see so many healthcare providers talking about healthcare as a right, not a privilege. It was clear that everyone in the room felt a deep sense of pride for the work that they do and the marginalized communities they serve,” said Michael Kowalchuk, one of our architectural designers. “The night was a wonderful way to celebrate the ongoing progress and resiliency of the Chinese American community, one of New York City’s most vibrant immigrant communities.”

Dr. Sherry Huang and Dr. Angela Chan, from CBWCHC’s pediatrics department, resonated with me specifically by stressing the importance of providing those with specials needs the essential healthcare they require. They played a video of testimonials from family members of people with disabilities, describing how the clinic’s care and community has supported and empowered them. My brother was born with cerebral palsy, so that part of the night was particularly powerful for me.

Our relationship with the foundation began some 36 years ago when Harold and Judy Edelman first worked with the CBWCHC to develop their initial clinics. Last Tuesday night was full of reminders that we’re doing good work, but that the work isn’t over. It was also a night full of great food, discussion, and entertainment—so we thank the Chinatown Health Clinic Foundation for hosting, and look to continue building on this relationship for several more decades to come.